Please disable your Ad Blocker to better interact with this website.

Judicial Watch Top Investigator: Comey’s House Should be Raided by U.S. Marshals After Outing Himself as a Leaker [VIDEO]

Judicial Watch Director of Investigations Chris Farrell said that within 20 minutes of fired FBI Director James Comey’s testimony on Thursday the Department of Justice should have sent U.S. Marshals to raid his home.

Appearing on Lou Dobbs Tonight on Fox Business, Farrell said that the memos Comey admitted to leaking were “property of the U.S. government” and that he “absconded with them.”

About Comey’s admitted leaking and the bombshell announcement that then-Obama Attorney General Loretta Lynch ordered Comey to downplay the FBI’s “criminal investigation” against Hillary Clinton to only just being a “matter,” as to sound more innocent with American voters, Chris Farrell told Lou Dobbs:

“It’s clear the FBI director was taking instructions from Hillary Clinton’s campaign. Clearly, the attorney general was giving him talking points and he literally adopted them. 

This admission today is stunning. I would argue that Mr. Comey’s notes are the property of the United States government and that he absconded with them. 

Frankly, if I were the attorney general, about 20 minutes after his confession today in front of the Senate Intelligence Committee, Deputy U.S. Marshals would have raided his home and office, as well as Mr. Richman at Columbia Law School.” 

The “Mr. Richman at Columbia Law School” Farrell is referring to is Columbia professor Daniel C. Richman, the “good friend” Comey leaked an FBI memo to, according to his sworn testimony while being questioned by Sen. Susan Collins on Thursday.

Comey admitted that he leaked the memo after his firing, telling Richman to give it to the press in order to spur a special prosecutor in the phony Trump-Russia collusion narrative created by the Democrat Party and the Democrat Media Complex with no evidence to support the accusations.

“My judgment was, I needed to get that out into the public square, and so I asked a friend of mine to share the content of the memo with a reporter,” Comey admitted. “Didn’t do it myself for a variety of reasons, but I asked him to, because I thought, that might prompt the appointment of the special counsel,” Comey confessed.

As of the time of this writing, Richman’s bio on the Columbia website describes him as “an adviser to FBI Director James B. Comey.”

Furthermore, liberal legal scholar Jonathan Turley believes Comey’s leak of the memo is legally problematic and ethically troubling. Turley wrote following the testimony on Thursday:

“I find Comey’s admission to be deeply troubling from a professional and ethical standpoint.  Would Director Comey have approved such a rule for FBI agents?  Thus, an agent can prepare a memo during office hours on an FBI computer about a meeting related to his service . . . but leak that memo to the media.  The Justice Department has long defined what constitutes government documents broadly.  It is not clear if Comey had the documents reviewed for classification at the confidential level or confirmed that they would be treated as entirely private property.  What is clear is that he did not clear the release of the memos with anyone in the government.

Comey’s statement of a good motivation does not negate the concerns over his chosen means of a leak.  Moreover, the timing of the leak most clearly benefited Comey not the cause of a Special Counsel.  It was clear at that time that a Special Counsel was likely.  More importantly, Comey clearly understood that these memos would be sought.  That leads inevitably to the question of both motivation as well as means.”

Comey further points out the curious irony of Comey admitting to leaking documents after President Trump told him to crack down on leakers and quotes the law showing that whether Comey’s memo was classified or not is irrelevant:

“The admission of leaking the memos is problematic given the overall controversy involving leakers undermining the Administration. Indeed, it creates a curious scene of a former director leaking material against the President after the President repeatedly asked him to crack down on leakers.

Besides being subject to Nondisclosure Agreements, Comey falls under federal laws governing the disclosure of classified and nonclassified information.  Assuming that the memos were not classified (though it seems odd that it would not be classified even on the confidential level), there is 18 U.S.C. § 641 which makes it a crime to steal, sell, or convey ‘any record, voucher, money, or thing of value of the United States or of any department or agency thereof.'”

Watch Judicial Watch Director of Investigations Chris Farrell speaking with Lou Dobbs about Comey’s testimony below:

About the Author

Matthew K. Burke
Matthew K. Burke
A former Washington State U.S. Congressional candidate in 2010, Matthew attended the nation’s first modern day Tea Party in 2009 in Seattle, Washington. He also began writing and blogging that year. Matthew became a Certified Financial Planner in 1995 and was a Financial Advisor for 24 years in his previous life. Matthew was one of the three main writers leading a conservative news site to be one of the top 15 conservative news sites in the U.S. in a matter of months. He brings to PolitiStick a vast amount of knowledge about economics as well as a passion and commitment to the vision that our Founding Fathers had for our Republic.

 

Join the conversation!

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, vulgarity, profanity, all caps, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain a courteous and useful public environment where we can engage in reasonable discourse.

Sorry. No data so far.

Send this to a friend