Please disable your Ad Blocker to better interact with this website.

CNN’s Brooke Baldwin Outright LIES About Google Memo; Mary Katharine Ham Pounces [VIDEO]

After Google employee, James Damore, was fired for producing an epic 11-page memo questioning the company’s intolerant “ideological echo chamber” policies and overly oppressive politically correct culture, CNN’s Brooke Baldwin came to the rescue by either lying about the author’s message, or showing that she doesn’t know how to read.

Damore’s memo, simply recognized that there may be biological or scientific reasons why women have not been attracted to the high tech field to the exact same degree that men are, which may explain why Google and other tech giants tend to be highly represented by male employees.

Here’s a sample from the Google memo that displays James Damore’s level-headed assessment:

“I hope it’s clear that I’m not saying that diversity is bad, that Google or society is 100% fair, that we shouldn’t try to correct for existing biases, or that minorities have the same experience of those in the majority. My larger point is that we have an intolerance for ideas and evidence that don’t fit a certain ideology.

I’m also not saying that we should restrict people to certain gender roles; I’m advocating for quite the opposite: treat people as individuals, not as just another member of their group (tribalism).”

Yet, CNN’s Brooke Baldwin summarized Damore’s words as “I don’t like women anywhere near a computer.”

We’ll chock that up to fake news because James Damore did not state anything even remotely close to Baldwin’s characterization and CNN contributor Mary Katharine Ham, a conservative, could hardly wait to reply. After cocking her head to one side, shock at Baldwin’s ridiculous description of the Google memo, she pounced:

“I actually Brooke — and I often disagree with you in like a very jovial way — and I just totally disagree with the characterization that that’s what he’s saying. He wasn’t saying that. If it were what you were saying, I would be more on board with Liz’s point of view [opposing the memo harshly]. 

But look, I think we’re saying this is a valuable conversation to have.  And I agree, one of the things that this person was bringing to the table was that perhaps part of diversity is ideological diversity as well.” 

Mary Katharine Ham then pointed out the incredible irony, which has largely gone unnoticed by the media, that James Damore was fired for having a diverse opinion from a company that prides itself on diversity, describing Google as perhaps living in an “ideological insular bubble.”

Virtually all members of the Democrat Media Complex, including CNN, have reported the contents of Damore’s Google memo as an “anti-diversity” memo, even though there’s nothing anti-diversity about it. If anything, it was anti-tribalism — against treating people only as part of a larger group, instead of treating people the way they should be treated — as individuals, which is really a uniquely American principle enshrined in our founding documents.

Reporting like this is why the label “fake news” sticks so easily on outlets such as CNN.

WATCH:

About the Author

Matthew K. Burke
Matthew K. Burke
A former Washington State U.S. Congressional candidate in 2010, Matthew attended the nation’s first modern day Tea Party in 2009 in Seattle, Washington. He also began writing and blogging that year. Matthew became a Certified Financial Planner in 1995 and was a Financial Advisor for 24 years in his previous life. Matthew was one of the three main writers leading a conservative news site to be one of the top 15 conservative news sites in the U.S. in a matter of months. He brings to PolitiStick a vast amount of knowledge about economics as well as a passion and commitment to the vision that our Founding Fathers had for our Republic.

 

Join the conversation!

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, vulgarity, profanity, all caps, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain a courteous and useful public environment where we can engage in reasonable discourse.

Send this to a friend